#AAMC13 #BeyondFlexner: Tweeting Back to the Future

5 11 2013

I am just returning from AAMC 13 in Philadelphia, which happens to be the site of the very first AAMC conference in 1876.  Perhaps it is this historic backdrop which made it more poignant when AAMC President and CEO Dr. Darrell Kirch charged the audience to rise to the occasion during our most challenging time, or our healthcare system’s “moment of truth.”  Between sessions on how academic health centers needed to evolve to survive healthcare reform and how medical students need to avoid the “jaws of death” from the Match, there was certainly much to fear and much to learn. In spite of this, there are always moments where it was undeniable that the future was bright.  But, the most interesting moments at this meeting where when it felt like we were going back to the future.

One of those moments was sitting in on the CLER (Clinical Learning Environment Review), or the new ACGME institutional site visit process which is not meant to be scary, but helpful!  As a non-punitive visit, its meant to catalyze the necessary changes needed to help improve the learning climate in teaching hospitals. This session was particularly salient for me as I transitioned from being an Associate Program Director into role of Director for GME Clinical Learning Environment Innovation about a month ago.  At one point, Dr. Kevin Weiss described the CLER site visitors observing a handoff- and in that one moment, they saw the resident bashing the ER, failure of supervision, the medical students left out, and an opportunity to report a near miss that was ignored.  Even though CLER is new, he made it sound like the site visitors were going back in time and nothing had changed.  Have we not made a dent in any of these areas?  I guess it’s probably safest to pretend like its 2003 and we need a lot more training in quality, safety, handoffs, supervision, fatigue, and everyone’s favorite…professionalism.

After being the only tweeter at times in the Group of Resident Affairs sessions, I ventured into the tweeting epicenter of the meeting at the digital literacy session.  There, I not only learned about a very cool digital literacy toolkit for educators, but also got to connect with some awesome social media mavens who use technology to advance medical education. While I have access to these technophiles through Twitter (you know who you are), it was NOT the same as talking about the future of social media and medical education face-to-face.  Call me old-fashioned, but connecting with this group over a meal was just what this doctor ordered.  My only wish is that we had more time together…

Lastly, we went back to the future in our session showcasing the winners of the Teaching Value and Choosing Wisely Competition at both the AAMC and ABIM Foundation meeting last week.   One of the recurring themes that keeps emerging in these sessions, in addition to a recent #meded tweet chat, is that the death of clinical skills (history taking and physical exam) promotes overuse and reliance on tests in teaching hospitals.  Could it be that by reinvigorating these bedrock clinical skills and bringing back the “master clinician”, we could liberate our patients from unnecessary and wasteful tests?  I certainly hope so…and it can’t hurt to be a better doctor.  Moreover, one of the most powerful tools that was mentioned was the time-honored case report!  In fact, case reports have been resurrected to highlight avoidable care in a new JAMA Internal Medicine series called “Teachable Moments.”

And lastly, in the spirit of going back to the bedside, our MERITS (medical education fellowship team) submitted a video entry to the Beyond Flexner competition on what medical education would be like in 2033.  While the impressive winners are showcased here,  our nostalgic entry was aptly titled Back to the Future and Back to the Bedside, and envisioned a future where all students, regardless of their year, are doing what they came to medical school to do, see patients.

–Vineet Arora MD





Eating Chocolate and other lessons from the ABIM Forum

19 08 2013

Every year, the ABIM Foundation convenes a set of thought leaders on American health care to answer the tough questions.   At first glance, this year’s meeting  had the same standard agenda –  talks and discussions followed by networking and informal activities. However, for some reason, this Forum was more exhausting. Perhaps trying to solve the nation’s vexing problems facing health care is fatiguing! So, what were some of the themes that we came away with?

  • Intrinsic motivation is powerful, so can we create it? We heard about the potential dangers of extrinsic motivation through financial reward. Pay-for-performance, after all, is a tool that is only as good as the system is designed, and many designs have not been very effective. I was reminded of an unusual medical education experiment when they started paying residents in pediatrics on a fee-for-service model (yes, residents). The residents saw more patients, and their outcomes even improved with fewer ER visits! But, closer inspection yielded that these residents stacked their clinics with well child visits, who were healthier and did not need to visit the ER. So fee-for-service residency was abandoned. While everyone agreed it was time to move away from fee-for-service medicine, do we really think a change in the payment system creates intrinsic motivation? One health system offered their solution: recruit those that are intrinsically motivated. But, that still leaves us with how does one become intrinsically motivated? The answer likely lies in the last session of the meeting –find and cultivate joy in work. After all, if the work of transformation is enjoyable, people will do it for free.  And for physicians, joy does not come from lowering the GDP, but from treating the patient in front of you.
  • A series of small innovations add up to a larger one.  There were a series of innovators highlighted at the meeting who shared their innovation. While many were sharing large-scale innovations and initiatives like ACGME’s CLER Program, I shared a much smaller scale innovation, a redesigned resident clinic handoff using ideas generated from talking with over 100 patients about their experience. I certainly recognized the scale I was operating on was much smaller than some of the other folks in the room who lead large health plans or organizations. Then, one of the speakers who transformed their culture highlighted that it was a series of small innovations adding up to the larger one that made it doable. Featuring innovations at this meeting is not new, but the discussion of scalability was important. As each innovation was discussed, the question became how was this scalable and could be spread to others. This discussion was particularly salient to our Teaching Value Project team as we hosted a breakfast to not only introduce the project, but also discuss the future and how to spread this innovation…so stay tuned.
  • Organizational culture and leadership matters… a lot. While on the subject of necessary ingredients for innovation, the terms organization and leadership would probably be the biggest if we did a word cloud of what people said at this meeting. It can feel trite, but it’s true…leadership and culture are key. The type of leadership that was highlighted focused on nurturing innovators and supporting people in the work that they do. While they are not afraid to take risks, they are also understand their frontline clinicians and patients. Too bad they also sounded like an endangered species. Not surprisingly, many groups had the same action item – train visionary leaders to lead these healthcare systems of the future.  While we can wait for the new visionary leader to be manufactured, culture always halts people in their tracks. How do you create the culture you want? The recurring theme here was to make sure you had good people. In other words, recruit people for the culture you want, not the on you have. And for a real change, a more radical business approach would be to let go of the “protectionist mentality” where everyone is going to keep their job. Moving to a results-oriented work environment would mean not only recruiting the right people but getting rid of the wrong people. I’m not so sure our academic health systems are ready to do this, but it was refreshing to hear from a business leader that term limits and succession planning were the norm. In this way, organizations are automatically refreshed with new ideas from leaders who were prepared to lead.
  • Eating radishes when you want to eat chocolate is work. To summarize, forcing people to exert willpower to resist what they want to do (eat chocolate) by doing something else (eating radishes) translates into hard work to resist, and less patience for something else. A more complete explanation of this study is here. Sure, this sounds simple, but we do keep piling quality measures and requirements on every physician in the context of a 15 minute office visit. Unfortunately, electronic health records are forcing us to eat more radishes, and this comes at the expense of talking to patients. At least two innovators solved this problem by having someone else eat the radishes, such as a scribe in primary care so that physicians could focus on the joy, spending more time with patients.
  • Ask patients to help design the solution.  While this may sound like a no brainer, its not as easy as it sounds!  This is an unusually high level of patient engagement that most of our organizations are not used to. In one stunning example, a hospital in Sweden redesigned its dialysis center so patients can swipe in whenever they want and self-administer their dialysis. In the innovation I presented, we asked 100 patients in our resident clinic what would make their clinic handoff go smoother when they transitioned PCP’s when their residents graduated.  The answers led us to interventions that we never would have thought of, like honoring the patients with a certificate to recognize their teaching efforts of our residents and a cartoon to facilitate patients learning how the process of the handover occurs and what they should do.

So, what does this mean for future doctors? Well, it starts with recruiting intrinsically motivated individuals and training them to be healthcare leaders who can learn to work alongside patients to generate small innovations that can add up to larger organizational transformation.  And let them eat chocolate … so they too can find the joy in their work.

–Vineet Arora MD





Teaching Crucial Conversations: The Curse of Knowledge & the ASK Problem

4 09 2012

One of the most interesting conversations that I had recently was at the ABIM Foundation Summer Forum Open Space Sessions.  The ABIM Foundation Summer Forum is a summit of thought leaders and experts representing healthcare organizations, policymakers, patients, payers, doctors, and trainees who come together to tackle a major problem in healthcare.  The topic of this year’s forum was in keeping with the launch of the new ABIM Choosing Wisely Campaign and aptly named “Choosing Wisely in an Era of Limited Resources.”

The Forum has a unique format, employing a mix of routine panel discussions, but also “Open Space” conversations where participants actually drive the agenda, deciding what they want to work on.  One of the Open Space topics that I ended up joining was on how to train physicians to have crucial conversations with patients.   After forming this group, there were some immediate questions raised– why only physicians?  What about other members of the care team, including the patient?  Moreover, individuals in our group each had a different definition of what  “crucial conversations” were.  One clear theme was around end-of-life conversations with patients, but that was not the only one.  For example, how to talk to a patient who is asking for a medical test that is not indicated?

As I returned home, I reread some of the literature I have become acquainted with on why we (humans) don’t communicate as well as we should.  Using this framework, it’s worth considering why doctors and patients may not communicate as well as they should.  Drawing from the knowledge communication literature when an ‘expert’ is communicating to a ‘decision maker’, two distinct problems can arise:

  • Curse of Knowledge– The curse of knowledge, otherwise known as the paradox of expertise, represents the difficulty of experts to use commonplace jargon to communicate their ideas to those that are not experts.  Because experts tend to surround themselves with other experts, it can be very difficult for an expert not to use technical jargon when communicating with people who not experts.  This is easily evident in a variety of scenarios – most notably in the first few seconds of the trailer for the movie Contagion when doctors try to tell Matt Damon that his wife, played by index case Gwyneth Paltrow, is dead.  The doctor starts by saying “I am sorry…she failed to respond”.  On cue, Matt Damon responds, “OK can I go talk to her?” clearly missing the meaning of what the doctor has just tried to communicate.  Likewise, one of the patient advocates at our table shared the story of how she came to know she had cancer – “It’s malignant” …so she deduced from “Mal” and all the words that start with “mal” are bad (malice, malpractice…to name a few) so she thought “Mal … bad”.
  • ASK Problem – the ASK Problem stands for the Anomalous State of Knowledge.  This is a problem that arises when the decision maker does not have the knowledge that it takes to ask questions, since asking questions often relies on having intimate knowledge of the subject at hand.   This is particularly salient since we have major campaigns that often are directed at patients to “ask more questions” of their doctor.  However, it may be very hard for a nonexpert to ask a question of an expert if they don’t have a set of common knowledge to go on.  Asking questions is so difficult that our work shows its rare for even physicians to ask other physicians questions, and instead they opt for what is known as “back-channeling” or saying “Uh-huh” to indicate their agreement.  The only problem with this is that back-channeling is that it can be exhibited by demented patients so it is not necessarily a confirmation of comprehension or understanding.  To make matters worse, a recent study shows that patients may not ask questions for fear of being labeled “difficult”.

How can we get around these problems? Well, improving a conversation requires training on all sides. Patients can also be coached to take a more active role in their care. However, healthcare personnel also need to be prepared so that their newly empowered patients are not an unwelcome surprise. Physicians and other healthcare personnel need to be trained in how to speak to patients about difficult decisions in a sensitive way.   One model curriculum we can learn from has been developed by oncology fellowship directors and is called OncoTalk.  One of the key tenants is the principle of NURSE, which describes how to respond to patient emotions during complex decision-making.

  • Naming the emotion “It sounds like you are afraid of X”
  • Understanding the emotion  “I can understand the fear that goes along with X.”
  • Respecting  “You are asking the right questions…”
  • Supporting  “I am here to support you through this decision…”
  • Exploring  “What are you thinking about now?”

Of course, the age-old question is can you teach empathy? Well, according to one recent study, empathy wanes throughout medical school.   So we should, at the very least, try to at least preserve it.

Vineet Arora MD





Transforming Medical Education: Trust, Time, Teams & Technology

28 11 2011

This past Thanksgiving, I was able to reflect on the always jam-packed and inspiring Association of American Medical Colleges 2011 Meeting that took place earlier this month in Denver.  The theme of the meeting was transformation.  It was certainly an interesting theme with the undertones of economic recession and the GME funding crisis- and that was before the failure of the Supercommittee to reach a resolution.  So, how does medical education need to transform?  In more ways than one, it turns out.  So here are just 4 that were the recurring themes of the meeting and being a fan of alliteration, they all begin with “T”.

  • Trust – it was clear that we need to restore the Americans people trust in physicians and in the medical education process.  While students enter medicine to make a difference, something that they see in their journey to becoming a physician makes them jaded and they sometimes lose sight of their initial intention. Is it debt, burnout, role models…Or likely some combination of the 3? It does not matter, because we have to restore their faith in teaching– yes teaching.  Teaching is the heart and soul of our medical education and it is sometimes the easiest to lose in an academic health center focused on NIH dollars or US news world report rankings.  In addition to teaching our students, it is time to teach another constituency, our patients and Congress about the critical need for medical education.   And in fact, advocacy is something we need to be teaching our own trainees so they can engage in the dialogue regarding the future of healthcare.
  • Time- perhaps the most radical proposal advanced was by Victor Fuchs who suggested that we radically redesign medical school to have medical students specialize 2 years after medical school and enter specific pathways like they do in many other countries and in other fields.  I’m all for shortening dwell time for our medical trainees, but I am not so sure that young people are ready to make a serious commitment about what they want to do at such an early age.  There has to be a middle ground since at the same time, one of the most well attended sessions was “who cares about the 4th year of medical school?” which included many insightful comments about the need for reflection and consolidation of core skills.  So, clearly not all time is easily tossed to the waste side.
  • Teams- given the projected shortage of over 90,000 physicians by 2020, it is important to reorganize care into teams.  While there is a lot of controversy about what to call nurses who have PhDs, that was not the focus of the meeting. It was about how can you encourage everyone to practice to their highest level of certification.  Team based competences have actually been developed by several groups and have been advanced by many schools with inter professional learning.  One difficulty we face at home is that we don’t have allied health professions, but we are brainstorming how to involve actual nurses and pharmacists in training medical students.
  • Technology -there was a lot of discussion about technology to boost medical education.  There was even a technology in medical education abstract session moderated by @motherinmedicine and including podcasts, iPads, and social media in medicine.  Perhaps the most interesting speaker was Chuck Friedman at the University of Michigan who is the former technology czar of the US and eloquently highlighted the need for moving medical education from wrote memorization to a distributed knowledge where the most important information future physicians will need to know is not what the information is off the top of their head BUT how to access information.  He went so far to say testing would move to “unassisted testing” followed by “cloud-supported testing” which would then merge into a pass or fail based on performance on both.  I know all of us who certified or recertified recently would welcome assistance from the cloud- it is after all the closest approximation to real medicine.  However, my hands down favorite moment of this session was when someone astutely asked what about these physicians when the power goes out or when the computer system fries.  His response was simple and so spot on… “Dont get me started on the state of IT in our teaching hospitals”.
So, while we just celebrated a holiday and accompanying ritual to give thanks, it is now time for medical educators to transcend the traditional status quo and instead test novel techniques to transform medical training — not only to restore public trust but so we can also train the trainees who will treat us in the future.
–Vineet Arora MD




Whittling Costs in White Coats

10 08 2011

At the beginning of last week, I was excited to be invited to take part in the ABIM Foundation Summer Forum, where the who’s who in medicine convened to discuss how to create a sustainable healthcare system, where costs are controlled and quality of care is preserved.   We heard some bold vision and ideas, many of which were focused on badly needed policy levers or system redesign.  However, as I ended my week on Sunday with investing Pritzker’s new medical student class with their white coats, I was wondering how we can teach and empower individual trainees to do their part.  As our speaker highlighted so eloquently, the most powerful thing about the white coat is what and who is in it…and also the learning that takes place in it.  So, in that vein, here are some thoughts for what students and residents can do.

  • Read up on the topic – some excellent resources I heard about at the meeting
  1. Physician Stewardship of Health Care in an Era of Finite Resources– a recent article in JAMA by Drs. Chris Cassel and David Reuben regarding the various levels of stewardship
  2. Personal Reflections on the High Cost of American Medical Care – a recent article in Archives of Internal Medicine by Dr. Steven Schroeder
  3. The Pricing Of U.S. Hospital Services: Chaos Behind A Veil Of Secrecy – a classic by noted economist Uwe Reinhardt
  4. Less is More Series – a great resource in Archives of Internal Medicine edited by Rosemary Gibson and others.
  • Listen to the patient  Of course, this sounds simple…but the truth is that more times than not, the answer is in the patient history.   With duty hours and workload, taking a detailed history sometimes takes a backseat to reviewing the electronic iPatient.  One approach is to start with two open questions:  (1) Tell me about yourself; and (2) What are your healthcare goals?   Often, the key is to try to understand the baseline.  I once took care of an older patient who had abdominal pain and had received over 40 abdominal CTs over the past several years.  When we were able to gather more information from the patient and her family, it turns out that she has had bad abdominal pain for over 30 years that would come and go!   By working this information into her discharge summary and plugging her into primary care, our hope was to have her avoid future costly and harmful workups.  As I’ve mentioned before, students often have more time with patients than residents or attendings and can often take the most helpful and detailed history!
  • Learn the physical exam Often times, we rely on tests since we do not trust our physical exams.   It is too easy to get an echo when you are wondering if you are truly hearing a murmur.  The lore here is that you need to  listen to a lot of normals to be able to detect the abnormal.  Because of this, when I am on service, I usually invite the third year student to examine every patient with me so they can see a lot of exams.  Usually by the end, they are more confident in their ability to detect crackles or murmurs.  As stated by our white coat speaker, the stethoscope is indeed a powerful tool.  Interestingly, with the infectious increase in global health experiences among medical students and residents, working in resource poor settings requires ingenuity and reliance on the lowest technologically feasible solution.   Closer to home, volunteering in a free clinic is likely to provide one with the same experiences.
  • Don’t just check boxes but ask why the test is indicated Trainees can ask the difficult question – why are we ordering this test or medication?  Is it indicated?   An even better question to research is whether there is a CHEAPER (we can’t shy away from using that word anymore) alternative that would provide the same information?   For example, before every PE protocol CT or Doppler to rule out DVT, I always ask my team to calculate the Wells score so we understand if the test is indicated and what our pretest probability is.  In addition, every study has a downside, whether it be hospital-acquired anemia from phlebotomy or incidentalomas and pseudodisease from excessive imaging.  It is easy to check boxes, it is harder to question why you are checking them.
  • Try to find out how much the test costs While the answer is elusive, the goal is to start the conversation in your own backyard.  There are anecdotal reports of residents going back over 10 years who have tried to work with their hospital billing departments to find out how much things cost.  Moreover, greater knowledge of costs will change practice patterns as we’ve discussed before.
  • Counsel patients One impressive thing about the ABIM Foundation Forum was the representation of patient advocacy groups who were willing to partner with physicians and physician groups to reduce the costs of care.  While the image that may immediately come to mind most is of a patient coming in to request a test that is not indicated, engaged and informed patients expressed the desire to work together and that less is more.   In some communities, there is a lot of distrust of the medical care system and these conversations have to start one patient at a time.

Unfortunately, whittling healthcare costs is not as easy as teaching trainees.  As long as our systems and the faculty within them promote costly workarounds such as misrepresenting tests as urgent to expedite them, ordering tests as fast as possible for fear of discharge delay, or wasteful lab testing, trainees will be reprimanded for NOT doing something.  Therefore, to truly make change in our teaching hospitals, we must also ask that our faculty reach deep into their own white coats and find the courage to say “Don’t just do something, stand there.”

–Vineet Arora, MD





Vampires and Urban Legends: Teaching Residents about Healthcare Costs

24 05 2011

This past weekend, I gave a talk at the Committee of Interns and Residents, the largest housestaff union in the United States.  The most inspiring moment of the meeting that I witnessed were the 2 standing ovations earned by Dr. Koffler for advocating for residents to get paid in 1936 (her first paycheck was 15 dollars a month!).   How could I follow that…especially with a talk on how to train cost-conscious physicians?   Those who know my work well may even wonder how I got invited to talk about this.  Well, earlier this December, I wrote on the blog about my holiday wish list for medical education and #2 was a curriculum on cost conscious practice for medical trainees.   In addition to lack of a formal curriculum, there were several other barriers on teaching residents how to practice cost-conscious medicine that I discussed.

  • Faculty are not trained.  The largest barrier of course is that faculty don’t know how to do this.  A study in Journal of Hospital Medicine showed that faculty physicians could not identify what things cost.
  • No one knows what the cost of anything is.  Because each hospital negotiates its own prices with suppliers, it is very difficult for residents to know how much things cost.  In trying to find out how much your hospital charges for various tests, you may end up on a wild goose chase until you find the helpful person who may or may not even be in your state!
  • Bad systems promote costly workarounds.  Most of the time, residents are too concerned that they won’t be able to get a test or worse, it will delay a patient’s discharge.  The system is set up to order the test even if the attending thinks about it.  Some of our own data shows that interns learn during internship to misrepresent tests as urgent to get the job done.
  • Rumors and hospital legends spread quickly.  The highly connected residency program can actually spread rumors about how much things cost or give rise to urban legends when patients actually pay and don’t pay.
  • Underordering, not overordering, is penalized.  Due to the highly litiginous environment, most attendings encourage residents to err on the side of getting a test since the biggest fear we all have is of missing the ‘can’t miss’ diagnosis.  More reasons doctors over-order tests here.

So what can we do to teach residents about cost-conscious practice?  Well here are just a few of the things we can do..

  • Empower residents to find out how much their hospital charges for things.  As I said at the conference, we may need to start a support group for those that start down this daunting path – but it is the first step to understanding how to control costs.  Starting with senior leadership could be helpful – after all, how many C-suite leaders would not want to find out how to teach residents to control their costs? There is also a related movement to improve price transparency for patients.
  • Show residents how much they spend.  At least in the case of daily phlebotomy, a recent study dubbed “Surgical Vampires” (due to the daily blood draws ordered by the surgical interns) highlighted that letting residents know how much things cost actually reduced the cost of lab ordering per patient and resulted in 50,000 dollars saved over 11 weeks!  Studies with electronic health records at the point of care show even greater results!
  • Use unbiased resources that promote better cost-effective decisions.  Specialty societies like the American College of Physicians and the American College of Radiology are now starting to create guidelines that encourage cost-effective practice through more judicious use of imaging or other therapeutic modalities.   The popular 4 dollar list for medications is another example.
  • Incorporate discussions of costs into routine educational conferences.  At Harvard, one chief resident started a Hospital Bill Morning Report for the residents to review what a patient bill is like.  In our medical student lectures on radiology, the costs of the tests are also now discussed.
  • Educate patients that less is sometimes more.  Letting patients know about the risks of overordering tests- specifically workups of incidentalomas and pseudodisease may be helpful in explaining your new approach to cost-conscious medicine.   The pushback from patients may be the fear of rationing,  which is of course irrational since it already occurs.  A helpful summary for patients on high value cost conscious medicine appeared in Annals of Internal Medicine.
As with all things, there is the potential for unintended consequences in teaching cost-conscious medicine.  The most egregious of which would be to hide behind the veil of practicing cost-conscious medicine in order to shirk work and avoid getting an indicated test when needed.   This is especially important to watch out for as burnout sets in late in the academic year.  So, as we resist our inner vampire urge to order blood tests and uncover hospital urban legends and myths about healthcare costs, its equally important not to morph into the haphazard and dangerous cost-cutting monsters that we all fear most.
–Vineet Arora, MD




Twitter to Tenure: 7 ways social media advances my career

2 05 2011

As part of our SGIM Social Media Workshop “From Twitter to Tenure” our workshop lineup of ‘twitterati’ will be posting each day this week about how social media affected their career.   So yesterday was @AlexSmithMD on GeriPal.   Here is the schedule for the week:  Monday – me (@FutureDocs) here on FuturedocsTuesday – Bob Centor (@medrants) on DB’s Medical RantsWednesday – Kathy Chretien (@MotherinMed) on Mother’s in MedicineThursday – Eric Widera (@ewidera) on GeriPal (and hope to see you in Phoenix for our workshop!)

For the Twitter to Tenure workshop at this year’s Society of General Internal Medicine Meeting, I was asked to think about how social media enhanced my career.  This may sound ridiculous at first- after all, social media is a big waste of time right? Wrong as some of you have discovered.  Social media has opened doors for me by connecting me to a variety of people I would not have met.  Here is just a brief list of the ways social media has impacted my academic career.

  • Media interviews – I was interviewed by Dr Pauline Chen through the New York Times who located me through – you guessed it Twitter!  She actually approached me for the interview by direct messaging me through Twitter.  She was following me and noticed my interests in handoffs on my Google profile which is linked to my Twitter account.  She was also very encouraging when I started the blog which was exciting!
  • Workshop presentations- I presented a workshop on social media in medical education (#SMIME as we like to call it), at 2 major medical meetings with 3 others (including @MotherInMed who encouraged me to start a blog and also is my copresenter at SGIM).  The idea was borne on Twitter…and the first time I actually met one of the workshop presenters (who I knew on Twitter) was at the workshop.
  • Acquired new skills  – My workshop co-presenter who I only knew through Twitter ended up being Carrie Saarinen, an instructional technologist (a very cool job and every school needs one!).  She is an amazing resource and taught me how to do a wiki.  After my period of ‘lurking’, I started my own ‘course’ wiki  dedicated to helping students do research and scholarly work which we are launching in a week.
  • Lecture invitations – Several of my lecture invitations come through social media.  Most notably, I was invited to speak for an AMSA webinar on handoffs and also speak to the Committee of Interns and Residents on teaching trainees about cost conscious medicine.  Both invitations started with a reference to finding me through Twitter or the blog.
  • Committee invitations – I am now on the SGIM communications task force as a result of my interest in social media.  Our most recent effort was a piece about ‘tweeting the meeting’ with @medrants and an older piece focused on the top Twitter Myths and Tips.
  • Grant opportunities – I recently submitted a grant with an organization that I learned of on Twitter – Initially, I had contacted Neel Shah from Costs of Care asking him if they had a curriculum on healthcare costs.  They did not, but were interested in writing a grant to develop a curriculum so they brought my team on board and we submitted together (fingers crossed).
  • Dissemination - One of the defining features of scholarship (the currency of promotion in academic medical centers) is that it has to be shared.   Well, social media is one of the most powerful ways to share information.   In a recent example, we entered a social media contest media video contest on the media sharing site Slideshare.  Using social media, we were able to obtain the most number of ‘shares’ on Facebook on Twitter which led to the most number of views and ultimately won ‘Best Professional Video.’  To date, this video, has received over 13,000 views, which I was able to highlight as a form of ‘dissemination’ in a recent meeting with our Chairman about medical education scholarship.    While digital scholarship is still under investigation with vocal critics and enthusiastic proponents debating the value of digital scholarship in academia, digital scholarship does appear to have a place for spreading nontraditional media that cannot be shared via peer review.

Part of being a good citizen on social media is giving back.  I try to give back when I can through helping anyone who contacts me for something specific – so I have read personal statements, reviewed websites, and offered input to others who are interested in my perspective on their work.  I can’t always keep up since I have a day job and alas, this is an extracurricular activity.  The good news is a tweet is only 140 characters  – so like the blue bird, I can keep it short but sweet.

–Vineet Arora, MD








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