Making the Most of the iPad Mini on Medicine Rounds

20 12 2012

On my birthday several weeks ago, I was lucky to get an iPad Mini from my husband. I already have an iPad and have shared my experience. In fact, we gave all of our residents iPads (one of them contacted Steve Jobs and got a response), and documented an improvement in efficiency on the wards. So why the Mini? What is all the fuss? Well, after finishing 2 weeks on service, I can finally tell you why the Mini is the new must-have for doctors and future doctors.

  1. It fits in your white coat! Yes, while there were entrepeneurs who started creating the iCoat, the truth is who wants to wear a coat with a huge pocket on the side? This means that you also don’t need to wear the “strap’ that we require our residents to wear for the iPad since we did not yet invest in the iCoat.
  2. You can hold it in one hand! This for me is the best part and very underappreciated point in the blogs and reviews I have read. This means you can tough the screen with one hand while you are palming it with the other. I don’t even have the largest hands so I would say it definitely was just at the reach of my palm grasp but I can imagine it would be perfect for my male colleagues.
  3. It fits in your purse! While the female docs may find palming the iPad mini not as easy as the men, never fear…since this one is for the ladies. Many female doctors are always on a quest to find the right handbag/workbag combination. Owning an iPad always meant buying boxy “folio” type purses or shoving it to barely fit in a handbag. The mini is the PERFECT size for a medium size handbag – hobo or satchel. This means that you can go from day to night without carrying your “work bag” to the restaurant. And for the men out there, you can always get a “murse” this holiday season. I hear that they are making a big splash.
  4. You’ll carry it more. Number 1 through 3 really boil down to the fact that it is hard to carry the iPad. Because it is so easy to carry, you won’t find yourself without access to the electronic health record or paging directory. You may be more apt to show patients their images or X-rays or look something up because it is not as hard to use.
  5. You’ll make friends. Basically the minute I brought out the Mini, everyone…nurses, social workers, residents, students, and yes patients were interested in seeing it – “Mini envy” as my students called it. It’s a conversation starter that can improve collegiality and teamwork. When I visited floors that I did not usually work on (overflow patients), I met a nurse who asked me about the Mini – and the next day, she came to our rescue when we were trying to decipher the timing of a patient’s medication and a potential new allergy.
  6. It is more discrete to use at a conference (once everyone stops staring). The Mini is smaller so a bit more stealth in terms of answering a text page or checking a lab while you are sitting in case conference, and you can easily stash it back in your purse as noted above.

Some things to think about. The Mini is not without its pitfalls – many of which are predictable due to its size and interface.

  1. For the visually challenged, it can be hard to see. Sure… you can always “magnify” things with the correct gestures. But, if you are in your Citrix Client looking at your electronic health record, it may not be so easy to magnify and you may have to hold it up closer to your face which can be awkward. Maybe I just need to get my vision tested? Either way, something to be aware of.
  2. Easy to lose. As part of the residency program project, the nice thing about the iPad with strap is you an see it on the resident and its harder to walk off with. The Mini could disappear in a snap. Could someone even “pick-pocket” a doctor coat? Very possible.
  3. It is not a complete substitute for a workstation or pen and paper. This is not unique to the Mini. There is a reason that mobile tablet computing is not a complete substitute for a workstation – the lack of a keyboard. As a result, some our residents carry “paper notes” with their iPad – the paper notes are to take notes of the to-do list that is created on rounds -nothing like checking all those boxes off as an intern. The iPad does not replace that so readily – and while there others thinking about this space, its worth noting that the preference for pen and paper to organize one’s thoughts is very strong. I have to admit, watching the catchy commercial for the Windows Surface, there is still something so appealing about an external keyboard.

So what is the verdict for the Mini? Well, as we say in medicine, the risks of the Mini are outweighed by its benefits making it the perfect prescription for all the physicians or physicians to be in your life. And there’s still a few shopping days left before Christmas…

Happy Holidays!

Vineet Arora MD





Whittling Costs in White Coats

10 08 2011

At the beginning of last week, I was excited to be invited to take part in the ABIM Foundation Summer Forum, where the who’s who in medicine convened to discuss how to create a sustainable healthcare system, where costs are controlled and quality of care is preserved.   We heard some bold vision and ideas, many of which were focused on badly needed policy levers or system redesign.  However, as I ended my week on Sunday with investing Pritzker’s new medical student class with their white coats, I was wondering how we can teach and empower individual trainees to do their part.  As our speaker highlighted so eloquently, the most powerful thing about the white coat is what and who is in it…and also the learning that takes place in it.  So, in that vein, here are some thoughts for what students and residents can do.

  • Read up on the topic – some excellent resources I heard about at the meeting
  1. Physician Stewardship of Health Care in an Era of Finite Resources– a recent article in JAMA by Drs. Chris Cassel and David Reuben regarding the various levels of stewardship
  2. Personal Reflections on the High Cost of American Medical Care – a recent article in Archives of Internal Medicine by Dr. Steven Schroeder
  3. The Pricing Of U.S. Hospital Services: Chaos Behind A Veil Of Secrecy – a classic by noted economist Uwe Reinhardt
  4. Less is More Series – a great resource in Archives of Internal Medicine edited by Rosemary Gibson and others.
  • Listen to the patient  Of course, this sounds simple…but the truth is that more times than not, the answer is in the patient history.   With duty hours and workload, taking a detailed history sometimes takes a backseat to reviewing the electronic iPatient.  One approach is to start with two open questions:  (1) Tell me about yourself; and (2) What are your healthcare goals?   Often, the key is to try to understand the baseline.  I once took care of an older patient who had abdominal pain and had received over 40 abdominal CTs over the past several years.  When we were able to gather more information from the patient and her family, it turns out that she has had bad abdominal pain for over 30 years that would come and go!   By working this information into her discharge summary and plugging her into primary care, our hope was to have her avoid future costly and harmful workups.  As I’ve mentioned before, students often have more time with patients than residents or attendings and can often take the most helpful and detailed history!
  • Learn the physical exam Often times, we rely on tests since we do not trust our physical exams.   It is too easy to get an echo when you are wondering if you are truly hearing a murmur.  The lore here is that you need to  listen to a lot of normals to be able to detect the abnormal.  Because of this, when I am on service, I usually invite the third year student to examine every patient with me so they can see a lot of exams.  Usually by the end, they are more confident in their ability to detect crackles or murmurs.  As stated by our white coat speaker, the stethoscope is indeed a powerful tool.  Interestingly, with the infectious increase in global health experiences among medical students and residents, working in resource poor settings requires ingenuity and reliance on the lowest technologically feasible solution.   Closer to home, volunteering in a free clinic is likely to provide one with the same experiences.
  • Don’t just check boxes but ask why the test is indicated Trainees can ask the difficult question – why are we ordering this test or medication?  Is it indicated?   An even better question to research is whether there is a CHEAPER (we can’t shy away from using that word anymore) alternative that would provide the same information?   For example, before every PE protocol CT or Doppler to rule out DVT, I always ask my team to calculate the Wells score so we understand if the test is indicated and what our pretest probability is.  In addition, every study has a downside, whether it be hospital-acquired anemia from phlebotomy or incidentalomas and pseudodisease from excessive imaging.  It is easy to check boxes, it is harder to question why you are checking them.
  • Try to find out how much the test costs While the answer is elusive, the goal is to start the conversation in your own backyard.  There are anecdotal reports of residents going back over 10 years who have tried to work with their hospital billing departments to find out how much things cost.  Moreover, greater knowledge of costs will change practice patterns as we’ve discussed before.
  • Counsel patients One impressive thing about the ABIM Foundation Forum was the representation of patient advocacy groups who were willing to partner with physicians and physician groups to reduce the costs of care.  While the image that may immediately come to mind most is of a patient coming in to request a test that is not indicated, engaged and informed patients expressed the desire to work together and that less is more.   In some communities, there is a lot of distrust of the medical care system and these conversations have to start one patient at a time.

Unfortunately, whittling healthcare costs is not as easy as teaching trainees.  As long as our systems and the faculty within them promote costly workarounds such as misrepresenting tests as urgent to expedite them, ordering tests as fast as possible for fear of discharge delay, or wasteful lab testing, trainees will be reprimanded for NOT doing something.  Therefore, to truly make change in our teaching hospitals, we must also ask that our faculty reach deep into their own white coats and find the courage to say “Don’t just do something, stand there.”

–Vineet Arora, MD





The 5 F’s for Futuredocs and New Interns

26 06 2011

 

Yesterday, a tweet caught my attention from @JasonYoungMD who stated “My Five Foundations of Felling Fine: Food, Fitness, Friends & Family, Falling Asleep, Fulfillment.”  This seemed like the best advice I had heard for the newbie interns taking teaching hospitals by storm as well as the rising third year medical students who are about to be unleashed on the wards (if they haven’t already).  It also is a great starting point for program directors who are wondering how to ensure that their residents are “Fit for duty” according to the new ACGME rules.

 

  1. Food – While this is basic part of sustenance, finding food sometimes in the hospital can be challenging, especially at odd hours.  Fortunately, this has gotten better, but the choices may not be healthier.  In my own hospital, I’ve seen the front lobby transform from a small coffee kiosk (Java Coast which was celebrated when it arrived) to a full fledged Au Bon Pain (ABP as we affectionately refer to it).  While ABP was a welcome addition, it is easy to consume a lot of empty calories eating muffins or breakfast sandwiches!  To make matters worse, research from one of our very own sleep research gurus has shown that the more sleep deprived you are, the worse food choices you make!  Therefore, the thing you will reach for after a night shift is going to be the carbohydrate loaded Danish.  Residency programs must know this and usually have morning reports full of this type of food. So, consider how you will make healthy food choices – whether that be bringing your own food, or finding out where the healthy options are.  Lastly, don’t forget about the empty calories that come with beverages, especially coffee-related drinks.  For you Starbucks fans, there is an app for that – and I guarantee you may change your choices.
  2. Fitness – Like food, fitness can be hard to come by.  Interestingly, working in the hospital can actually be a way to get exercise.  For example, some studies demonstrate that residents walk as much as 6 miles on call!   However, its also just as easy to sit behind a computer and take a “mission control” approach to your call night where you are monitoring all your iPatients.  So, think about this and consider wearing a pedometer and most importantly getting into a routine.  When time is of the essence, find a way to work fitness into your day like taking the stairs in lieu of the elevator, or parking farther away.  If you join a gym, you have to make sure you go…and one easy way of doing this is to make sure your gym is on your way home from work and that is your first stop.  During residency, I actually switched to a gym that was directly on my route home that had a parking lot so I literally had no excuse and actually felt guilty while I drove by and did not stop there.  Others opted for 24hour gym craze that that could work for anyone’s schedule.  Lastly, exercising with a friend will likely lead to greater results than the solo work out.
  3. Friends & Family – Speaking of friends and family, this is the support system that gets interns through residency.  Fortunately, another omnipresent F can be helpful here – Facebook.   Busy interns or students can at least get reminders to electronically wish your friends happy birthday or log in on that random Monday off to reconnect with friends.   It’s also important to set appropriate expectations with your friends and family, for example when you are starting on a time intensive rotation that can be demanding.   Because of the intense nature of working in the hospital, some of you will form fast friendships with your co-interns and residents which can be helpful to get you through.  However, even your closest friends (including those at work) will ask you to choose between them and sleep- which can be very tough when you are running low on sleep.
  4. Falling asleep –So, speaking of sleep, my first question was where do I sleep?   Sounds silly I know, but I actually did not know where the call rooms were or did not have the call room key for my first call night ( I actually can’t remember which) so I ended up going to sleep for an hour in an unoccupied hospital bed.  So, this may not be possible today for 2 reasons: (1) interns are not likely sleeping when working the jam packed 16h shifts; and (2) hospital beds are nearly always filled! Still the challenge for today’s interns is getting sleep when working odd hours, especially if starting night shifts on night float or ‘night medicine’ as programs are evolving to include more night rotations.  If this means you have to invest in window treatments or wear an eyeshade at night, just do it.  There is nothing better than sleep for a resident and the more the better.  While your sleep at home may be limited regardless due to your other family obligations, its important to know your limits and set aside nights where you will recover.
  5. Fulfillment – Last but not least, its important to figure out how to keep yourself happy and fulfilled during your residency.  In some cases, that is a particular hobby or loved one that you need to stay in touch with.  In other cases, fulfillment is more complex.  It is not uncommon to have doubts about your future career as you stand by the fax waiting for outside hospital records, wait on the phone to schedule a follow up appointment for a discharged patient, or even transport a sick patient to get a needed test.  While many are working on ways to reduce the burden of this largely administrative work, interns and medical students are still straddled with a large amount of scut which can be demoralizing.  So, where do you find the fulfillment in your work? Well, you will find it when you least expect it – in the words of a patient who is eternally grateful.  In other cases, you will meet a mentor or role model who shares your passion and interest in medicine, whatever that may be, and can inspire you to keep you going. Whatever it is, find it and hang on to it for dear life during your darkest hours and it will pull you through.

I do need to add one more F to this fine list –  So provided that you are keeping up with the first 5 F’s, the best thing is that being in the hospital, learning medicine, and caring for patients is actually FUN!  So, don’t forget to pause and enjoy it…these tips will also serve you will in the FUTURE!

–Vineet Arora, MD

Other helpful posts to conquer any FEARS of starting on the wards:

What NOT to Wear on the Wards

How to Present to Your Attending





Blog ‘Paper’ Anniversary: Reflections & Top Posts of 2010

3 01 2011

It’s been one year of blogging or our ‘paper’ anniversary here on FutureDocs! 

I was reminded of this milestone with the receipt of the WordPress blog ‘report card’ below.   While I was excited to learn about the clean bill of health and intrigued by metrics related to shipping containers, I’m not going to lie.   It can be very challenging to stay fresh, write creatively, and keep up with posting while holding down an academic career.          

However, one thing I have learned (and confirmed by @MotherInMed who helped me get started) was that if you are inspired, the post will write itself (like this one).  Therefore, it is critical to pay attention to those moments you are inspired.  This gives rise to a somewhat startling personal observation– blogging can acutally improve your attention span and focus.  Sounds crazy, I know… But, unlike social media sites which can be highly distracting (Twitter or Facebook addicts anyone?), I find that I often pay closer attention to my surroundings so that I don’t miss the inspirational moment around the corner that I can share.   For example, in lieu of walking around aimlessly at medical conferences (a risk at any conference especially in medicine), I found myself taking notes and immediately reflecting on sessions to distill the most salient points, such as the oppressive nature of medical education or expert failure highlighted at the recent Association of American Medical Colleges.

In examining the report card below, the top posts on this blog are both predictable and surprising.  With the explosion of interest in technology and plenty of technophiles in the blogosphere, it is no surprise that posts about Twitter myths for docs and whether the iPad lives up to it’s hype on the wards are at the top.   The other 2 posts relate to career advising, which was a welcome surprise.  They also do reaffirm the need to continue to provide solid career advice to medical trainees, no matter how mundane (like what to wear to the hospital).   In addition to technology and career advising, I’ve enjoyed the ability to highlight various advocacy issues relating to medical education like healthcare reform, resident duty hours, the Match, and women in medicine.  Lastly, I must admit that I do enjoy writing for pure fun — like the posts on movies in medicine or healthcare phobias.   

Special thanks to uber medbloggers KevinMD and medrants who occasionally cross post or reference these posts and all those who subscribe and comment.   I was especially honored to be included in KevinMD’s top 10 posts of the year for this post on shadowing (which curiously did not make the WordPress list below).  

So here’s to more inspirational and informative moments of 2011, both in life and on the blogosphere.

–Vineet Arora, MD

***Blog Report Card From WordPress:

Fortunately, the stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and sent me the following high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

This blog was viewed about 20,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

In 2010, there were 30 new posts, not bad for the first year!  The busiest day of the year was March 5th with 304 views. The most popular post that day was Top Twitter Myths & Tips.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were twitter.com, kevinmd.com, Google Reader, medrants.com, and facebook.com.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

Top Twitter Myths & Tips February 2010
6 comments

Attending Rounds with the iPad – Hype or Hindrance? August 2010
13 comments

What Not to Wear: Hospital Edition May 2010
4 comments

Personal Statement Do’s and Don’ts July 2010
4 comments

KM3YKUY2DG5Z





Celebration On Call: Holidays for Healthcare Workers

5 07 2010

In honor of Grand Rounds (best of health blogosphere) theme over at GlassHospital, I felt motivated to write about celebration especially as we mark the first holiday of the new academic year.  However, when I sat down to think about celebration, I realized it is important to recognize how healthcare workers, including residents, celebrate holidays.  While many of us spent this past week at fireworks, festivals (Taste of Chicago anyone?), barbecues or even bar mitzvahs (where I happened to be), many healthcare workers spent their holiday caring for patients. 

For those residents and students (especially on those July subinternships) who are taking call for the first time on the holiday, it’s a great reminder that a life in medicine at times requires sacrificing personal pleasure.  With this in mind, I flashed up a picture of fireworks at this years orientation for our subinterns, knowing that many of them may not see them this year.  This sacrifice continues even for attendings.  For example, a colleague recently confided that they were slated to work on three different holiday weekends, but chose not to complain since everyone has their turn.  I remember my turn – as a resident, I worked every July 4th weekend either as a new intern or training the new interns.  As a first year hospitalist attending, I worked on the most undesired months: July (enough said), December (holidays), and March (Spring Break). 

Although healthcare workers sometimes miss celebrating with their family or friends, it does not mean that they don’t celebrate on the wards.   Celebrating on call comes with its own set of amusing traditions that keep healthcare workers and their patients in the holiday spirit.

  • Festive feasts  – This is by far the best part of being on call over the holidays.  When I was a resident, Thanksgiving meant holiday dinner sponsored by the program from eveyone’s favorite Indian restaurant.  If that wasn’t enough, one can always go from nursing station to nursing station looking for the most exciting confections leftover from the potluck lunch.  In my experience, the ICU nurses seem to have or know where the best treats are.   
  • Holiday trinkets – Over the past few years, I have started to realize the value of providing small holiday gifts to my teams that are on-call over the holiday.  This past year, when my team started on-call on New Year’s Day, I brought them candy cane pens  (always can get these at a discount after Christmas).  By far, the biggest hit in this category was the Christmas socks I gave my team when I was a first year attending.  The team became the envy of the hospital and the bright spot for our patients due to their excitement over their matching socks. 
  • Holiday decorations – There is nothing more festive than sprucing up the dry sterile hospital hallways with some holiday cheer.  However, its important that these decorations don’t interfere with patient care. This past Halloween, I was on rounds and started backing into the hallway when a patient transporter came through with a stretcher only to find myself screaming as I thought the ceiling was somehow caving in.  Fortunately, it was just a ghoul head hanging from the ceiling that got me.  I was okay and the event provided endless amusement for our team.  On a side note, while most holiday decorations use positive cheerful images, having skeletons and ghosts hanging on Halloween in a hospital ward may backfire.  
  • Pray for an easy night– This by far is the most important tradition, especially so holiday staffers can go home and celebrate the next day.  Unfortunately, holidays can either bring two different outcomes – the best night on call or the worst night ever.  Everyone knows holidays can be slow because patients and their families may choose to delay seeking care until the holiday is over.  However, by this same argument, anyone who forgoes their holiday festivities to come to the hospital is usually very sick.  Some have even studied this showing worse outcomes for patients admitted during holidays (which could be due to patient factors or hospital staffing).  For example, Americans are most likely to die on or after Christmas Day and on New Year’s Day than on any other day of the year.  And as USA Today recently reported, the number of hospital emergency department visits associated with underage drinking on July 4th nearly double.  In addition, certain conditions are especially prone to present over the holidays:

“Merry Christmas Coronary” and the “Happy New Year Heart Attack” – many reasons are postulated for the higher rates of heart attacks during these holidays including binge eating, drinking, stress, and suboptimal staffing at hospitals

 “Holiday Heart” – fast irregular heart rate due to alcohol binge in a person with an otherwise normal heart; also a favorite pimp question on cardiology

 “Gout: the Scourge of the Holiday Season” – overindulgence of certain foods especially over the holidays can trigger a gouty attack

“Holiday Blues” – some may feel down during the holidays due to a variety of reasons such as financial stressors or remembering those that have past away

 So, as we pass the first holiday of the new academic year, let’s remember to celebrate the healthcare workers who missed seeing fireworks because they were seeing patients.

 –Vineet Arora MD





What Not to Wear: Hospital Edition

17 05 2010

At a recent meeting I attended, a vigorous discussion broke out about what medical students, residents and attendings should wear, and more importantly what they should not wear.   Interestingly, patients have been asked to weigh in on this discussion.  What to wear is also on the mind of many current second year medical students who may find themselves trying to take study breaks from USMLE1 to go buy clothes for the wards.  I also remember doing this as a rising third year student and wondering what to get.  Here are some tips from our Associate Dean of Student Advising and Professional Development Dr. Shalini Reddy (@md2b_advisor).

  1. Don’t break the bank. Stores like Target, Marshalls, Sears or JCPenney are all fine places to get clothes for the hospital. You’ll be wearing your white coat over your clothes.  Save your money for your fourth year interview suit.
  2. The hospital is a messy place. Buy clothes which you wouldn’t mind throwing out if you were drenched in body fluids. (Not likely to happen but would be devastating if you’re wearing Prada or Valentino).
  3. Buy comfortable shoes.  You’ll be on your feet most of the day. There are actually studies that demonstrate that residents (who you’ll be following around) may walk up to 6 miles when on call!   It’s hard to answer “pimp” questions if you’re developing bunions and wondering when the heck you can take off those shoes. You’re feet will thank you…
  4. Get a waterproof, inexpensive watch.  You’re going to be washing your hands a lot. Being late to rounds is never good, but you may also lose your watch after you take it off to scrub in. A watch with an alarm can be very handy when you have to get up at 4 in the morning to pre-round for surgery. 
  5. Scrubs are for the hospital not for home.  As a New York Times article pointed out, no one wants to sit next to someone on the subway wearing scrubs, particularly those with uncharacterizable stains on them.  Scrubs are there, in part, to keep you from taking hospital germs into the community. It’s also hospital policy.  Unless a resident or student is staying overnight or involved with procedures, scrubs are a ‘dressed down’ look. So plan to change from scrubs to regular clothes before you wander around outside the hospital.
  6. Stock up on detergent, soap and deodorant. You’re going to be getting up close with your patients and if your clothes (or you) smell, they will feel even sicker than they already do.
  7. Buy a bleach pen.  This is very helpful for spot cleaning blood stains until you can get your coat back to your house for laundering. Peroxide works too.
  8. White coats (and ties for men) are still part of the uniform. Yes, there are studies showing white coats and ties spreading infection.  In the UK, they are already banning white coats.  However, for now in the US, they are considered part of the standard attire for physicians and medical trainees and what patients have come to expect.  In addition to washing your coat often, washing your hands is the #1 thing you can do to prevent infection.
  9. Wash that white coat. Those aforementioned uncharacterizable stains are really gross on white coats. Not a great way to instill confidence in your abilities with patients…or attendings.
  10.  No perfume or cologne. Remember the triggers for asthma? Perfume is one of them. Stick to “eau de soap and water.” Beware the overly scented deodorant too. Unscented soaps are typically the best for combating malodors while avoiding elicitation of bronchospasm.

 And some more tips especially for women

  1. Save the ‘Hospital Honey’ look for Halloween: Buy clothes for the hospital, not for going out: cover your cleavage, make sure your skirts reach at least mid-knee when you sit; shirts and pants/skirts should cover your midriff even when you raise your arms above your head.  Remember, you are not dressed to kill, but dressed to heal.  A patient actually called one of our attendings out for wearing loud, high heeled boots. An embarrassing reminder that we’re dressing for our patients not for each other.
  2. Minimize jewelry.  Make sure you don’t wear anything too expensive to work especially if you know you’ll have to take it off (e.g. engagement ring gets taken off whenever you put on gloves). Get a safety deposit box if you’re worried about leaving your jewelry at home. Stay away from hoop or dangling earrings. Your stethoscope will pull off the hoops and kids will pull off the danglers. Besides, you’ll get germs on anything that’s not attached closely to your body (e.g. stud earrings).
  3. Wear OSHA compliant Shoes (no open toe).  We know this is especially hard in the summer, when all the high fashion sandals and pedicured feet aching to show themselves.  Do everyone a favor and keep your toes covered and save your fashion forward footwear for an evening out with friends.  One of us actually took care of a female healthcare worker who had an IV pole run over their foot and contracted a MRSA foot infection – not fun!   As a result, every summer, we are on the hunt for comfortable but good looking pair of “OSHA shoes”- it’s harder to find that it looks!   DSW shoe warehouse is a good bet and won’t break the bank.  Dansko clogs are also a safe bet and Crocs are now making comfy shoes without holes. Stay away from Crocs with holes which just provide pores for body fluids and needles To get to your feet.
  4. Hold off on the fancy manicures. Your nails have to be short and you’ll be washing your hands often. Nail polish does not stand up well to frequent hand washing/Purell.

Lastly, for all the 2nd year medical students out there, good luck on Step 1 and starting the wards!

 Dr. Shalini Reddy & Dr. Vineet Arora








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